Home Science Education 12 Sports More Dangerous Than MMA

12 Sports More Dangerous Than MMA

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How dangerous is mixed martial arts? Some consider it so dangerous that they’ve expressed their intentions to have it completely banned (Arizona Senator John McCain wanted to ban MMA in the past). Many participants have suffered torn ligaments/tendons, broken bones, damaged cartilage, concussions, dehydration, including an entire laundry list of additional (unmentioned) brutal injuries.

However, as perilous as MMA may appear, statistically, it’s not hard to find other sports with more frightening track records.

If you can’t think of any sports that could be potentially more dangerous than MMA (keyword: potentially), then you really need to get out and experience the world. Here at Scifighting, we’ve researched some of the most risky, bone breaking, adrenaline inducing activities on the planet, and surprisingly, many of them aren’t even combat related. Some of these may make you laugh, some may shock you, and others, well, you’ll just have to read more to find out.

 

Cheerleading

TheCheerProfessional.com
TheCheerProfessional.com

I said some might make you laugh. If you’re chuckling at this, maybe you have a habit of judging too hastily. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, there have 26,000 injuries related to cheerleading on an annual basis since 2007. Common injuries include ankle and knee sprains, back injuries and concussions. If you’ve ever been a spectator at cheerleading competitions, this shouldn’t surprise you. Those girls get tossed up in the air pretty high. If their landing is anything short of perfect, the end result could be ugly.

 

Rugby

a-bloodied-george-north-battles-on-717275187-1790326
WalesOnline.co.uk

Here in the States, football players are considered to be our gladiatorial heroes in the world of athletics. However, in Europe, Rugby players are considered to be the real manly men of the sports arena. Rugby is very similar to football, except no pads and no stopping. Many rugby players suffer serious injuries like concussions, broken bones, and being paralyzed for the rest of their lives. According to Menshealth.com, Rugby is the most dangerous team sport in the world.

 

Bull Running

DailyMail.co.uk
DailyMail.co.uk

If you’re still laughing at the cheerleading part, maybe you should try bull running. Why not? Since 1910, only 15 participants’ lives have ended as a result of being fatally marred by the bulls, and there are only hundreds of serious injuries every year. What’s the worst that could happen? And besides, if you’re a serious jiu-jitsu practitioner, what better way to prove your grappling skills to the world than by submitting a giant bull weighing up to 2,000 pounds? If you want to get noticed by UFC President Dana White for a potential contract, I couldn’t think of a better way to impress him (I have to write this because some of you may actually be stupid enough to try and submit a bull. Please don’t, thanks).

 

Heli-Skiing

TheSkiChannel.com
TheSkiChannel.com

Still not satisfied? Try jumping out of a helicopter and skiing down some of the steepest mountains in the world. If you think this sounds fun, you should try heli-skiing. The risks in heli-skiing are basically the same as in regular skiing, except you have to make sure you land correctly after the initial jump, and your risk of getting buried alive in an avalanche is also much higher because most heli-skiing sites are in the “uncontrolled backcountry,” according to PowederHounds.com.

 

Street Luging

Commons.wikimedia.org
Commons.Wikimedia.org

I’m sure most of us have been skaters at some point in our lives, or at least played Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater on some sort of game console. Well, it’s time to take your extreme sports hobby to the next level. That next level is street luging. If you’re looking for an adrenaline rush, you won’t be disappointed. It’s not uncommon to reach breathtaking speeds up to 100 mph while street luging, and your almost unprotected if you crash, save your helmet and some leather attire. There hasn’t been that many deaths resulted from street luging crashes. So just don’t be a klutz and you’ll be fine.

 

Free Solo Climbing

TraditionalMountaineering.org
TraditionalMountaineering.org

Climbing with harnesses and an assortment of safety gear sounds boring right? If you agree, go find a cliff, and just start climbing. Who needs rope? Free solo climbing is one of the most dangerous activities in the world, if you grip onto an unstable rock and tumble down a cliff, you’re next climb could be a downward one… into your grave… with you being nailed shut in a coffin.

All jokes aside, the man featured in the image above (Michael Reardon) is an American professional free solo climber that died when he was swept to sea after climbing down a sea cliff in Ireland. The risks in free solo climbing are very serious, and you shouldn’t do it without proper training. RIP Michael Reardon.

 

Cave Diving

Science.NationalGeographic.com
Science.NationalGeographic.com

If you’re claustrophobic, you might want to skip this one. Cave divers find deep underwater caves and… well, they dive straight into them. Often, these caves are dark and uncharted, meaning the divers usually don’t have an exit plan before they go in; they improvise. The risks can be fatal. If you get stuck, entangled, or lost in the dark and can’t find your way out, eventually, you will run out of oxygen and die.

 

Base Jumping

en.Wikipedia.org
en.Wikipedia.org

BASE stands for Building, Antenna, Span and Earth. Base jumping is more dangerous than traditional skydiving because of the close proximity the jumpers have to other structures, which are usually the structures from which they jump, such as: cliffs, bridges, waterfalls, etc. A type of base jumping that is dangerous enough to scare even the most intrepid daredevils is wingsuit jumping. It’s similar to base jumping, except it’s done without a parachute. 

 

Equestrian

PhotoBlog.NBCNews.com
PhotoBlog.NBCNews.com

According to Riders4Helmets.com, over 100 deaths per year occur as a result of activities related to equestrian sports. Falling off a horse running 25 mph can result in broken bones, concussions, and even death. Also, some horses can weigh up to 1,100 pounds. Imagine if a 1,100 pound animal fell onto your leg; unless your Wolverine and you have bones made of adamantium, your leg is probably going to break.

 

Motocross

RacerXOnline.com
RacerXOnline.com

Who doesn’t think dirt biking is cool? Using an off road motorcycle to hit jumps and make sharp turns at amazing speeds while flaring up mud into bystander’s faces looks like lots of fun. You can be certain that fun surely doesn’t come without risks. According to Physioroom.com, the top five most reoccurring injuries in motocross are: 1) broken collar bone 2) broken wrist 3) AC join sprain 4) ACL rupture and 5) and a broken ankle.

 

Surfing

Domemploi.Wordpress.com
Domemploi.Wordpress.com

Riding waves that can be larger than twenty feet tall in an uncontrollable ocean full of dangerous marine life has its risks. There are a multitude of ways you can end your life while surfing. You could get caught in a riptide, get smashed by waves, break your bones and lose consciousness, get attacked by a shark, or just drown if you’re a poor swimmer.

 

Race Car Driving

AutomobileIndia.com
AutomobileIndia.com

Race car driving, whether its formula one, rally racing, or any other various type, has always been dangerous and exciting. Regular driving alone can be dangerous enough. Thousands of people die every year in traffic accidents involving automobiles. According to Asirt.com, approximately 1.3 million people die every year as a result of road crashes. In professional race car driving, some racers drive up to 200 mph. A serious crash at that speed is often fatal. Even so, some drivers have been in some extremely violent crashes and have lived to tell the tale. Take Austrian formula 1 driver Niki Lauda for example: In 1976, Lauda was involved in a very serious crash, but he still managed to survive. However, he suffered burns to his head and face, and the event has left him permanently scarred for the rest of his life. Here is a list of fatal accidents in NASCAR.

  • Jared

    Sadly its not about real world numbers. Boxing kills athletes every year, MMA…one death over its lifespan. It just looks meaner because you can use more tools and with those tools comes cuts. People who are vocally opposed to MMA simply don’t like the way it looks, and don’t care about the fact that its not as dangerous. Thats fine with me, I will never stop training for any of theses image people…they can change the channel. I understand the risks of what I am doing, and so do these athletes.

    • Indeed Jared, it is interesting to also consider how much impact the perceived lack of risk in these other activities plays into careless behavior. Such a lack of consideration for risks may even endanger participants further. Mixed Martial Artists’ awareness of the risks very likely results in better protection and conduct than would be otherwise.

    • Marek Saar

      But, because in sports like MMA, the main objective is to beat up the opponent. And you can clearly see people hit each other. And you can see them get injured and bloody all the time. Its fighting after all! But in other hands, in sports like like racing, mountain climbing, scuba diving and skydiving, the objective is clearly different. They are not about beating up the opponent, so no constant perceived violence. However, the kinetic energies involved in those sports are far more greater, so if things go wrong… well… you get the point 😛