Home News UFC: Phil Davis Refuses Machida Rematch After Controversial Decision

UFC: Phil Davis Refuses Machida Rematch After Controversial Decision

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After the MMA community exploded, crying robbery when Phil Davis defeated Lyoto Machida by unanimous decision at UFC 163, one would think Davis would be ready to prove the validity of his win to the doubters. It appears this is not the case. Phil is 100% certain the he beat Machida fair and square. Despite almost every MMA website scoring the fight for The Dragon, and polls among MMA forums showing over 90% of fans believing Lyoto won, Davis rationalizes his win by stating “I have 12 wins, 11 wins, all those guys want rematches, You’re not the first person who wants a rematch. You fight every fight like this. You fight close fights. Name one fight that he didn’t finish where he beat the crap out of somebody.” which is completely irrelevant to what actually happened.

Who cares if his opponents want rematches? Who cares if Lyoto doesn’t beat the crap out of somebody in a decision? No matter which way you look at it, a takedown in the last 30 seconds in only two of the three rounds, while being outpointed on the feet, does not add up to a win. Obviously he doesn’t want to discredit himself for a win, but to be so tactless as to say “You live by that sword, you die by that sword. When you habitually leave it to the judges, that strategy will fail you. I can’t say it any other way,” is simply a disrespectful approach to justify a win over somebody that even your boss Dana White believes beat you that night. We can only hope that something is done about the elephant in the room, which is judging in our sport.

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Adam Brennan
Coming from a family of fighters, and growing up on the jiujitsu mats of half a dozen MMA schools in Orange County and Los Angeles, Adam Brennan is a well informed member of the rapidly growing Mixed Martial Art community. As a competitor in the sport, he is very opinionated and vocal about both the flaws surrounding it and it's positive impacts on the martial arts community. Adam's love for the sport drives him to advocate solutions to issues and promote the successes. Dreaming of a career as a fighter, Adam spends his days as working two jobs and training hard every night at Kings MMA in Huntington Beach. Being a huge advocate of better athlete pay and a fighter union, he will stop at nothing to do his part to help bring the sport to the next level.
  • sanbaba

    Though I agree that Machida sows seeds of unpopularity by often playing it too safe, in this particular case Davis just admits his own defeat with his nonsensical comments. Davis didn’t do anywhere near enough striking to be called “agressive” or “a winner”… so by his own words he should lose for fighting a “close fight”. Both the caliber of judging and the scoring criteria need to change. All too often we see someone winning a decision for staying on the outside and occasionally jabbing. While it is a legitimate fighting style (as is Machida’s; though less jab-oriented it’s clearly built upon counter-attacking), I think it decreases UFC’s popularity considerably. The trouble of course, is that as the rules mature — and the fighting styles with it — all of these professional athletes are going to discover what every legendary sportsman discovers — that the best offense is a great defense (particularly in regards to professionalism — health, longevity, and sanity).

  • Adam Brennan

    You couldn’t be more right sanbaba. These are all points I was trying to express in the article. Decisions like this are just becoming absolutely ridiculous, and I don’t know how many more it is going to take to make some changes.