Dana White: A Promised Title Shot Don’t Mean Jack

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In the UFC, a promised title shot means the world to a mixed martial artist. Sadly these days are long gone. Dana White always announces that “this guy” is the top contender and that he will be fighting for the belt. Then suddenly someone else gets the title shot and “that guy” ends up competing in a different fight. What gives?

With everyone anticipating that Jon Jones will annihilate Chael Sonnen. Who does he fight next? Sounds like he is intrigued with a bout with Alexander Gustafsson, but the only problem is that both Lyoto Machida and Daniel Cormier are promised title shots against Jones.

After Machida’s victory over Dan Henderson at UFC 157, Dana White stated that he was the next contender and would fight the winner of Jones and Sonnen. Machida is a great fighter. No doubt about it. But NO ONE wants to see this rematch. He got destroyed by Jones the first time. No need for a sequel.

Whatever happened to fighters earning their title shot? Daniel Cormier is a great fighter, but we don’t know if he can make light heavyweight. His problems with cutting weight have been well documented since his kidney collapse during the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Alexander Gustafsson is the only fighter who truly earned his title shot. He is on a six fight winning streak and defeated a legend in Mauricio “Shogun” Rua. Last time we checked Shogun was still a top 10 fighter.

Dana White, please do us a favor. Only announce promised title shots if you are actually going to give it to them. No need for us to hear a bunch of title shots being granted. Fans come to rely on your word, please make it count!

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SciFighting News Desk
SciFighting's mission is to bring a higher standard of fitness to both the professional athlete and general population through concise reporting on the latest trends in the science of fighting. Our involvement in mixed martial arts spans both the professional and recreational realms of the sports. In addition to reporting on the news in the industry we function as a think tank, researching new facets of combat science and developing new tools and techniques to analyze theoretical and practical applications.
  • Evan Stoumbelis

    Agreed all around, Lyoto’s time has come and gone, Henderson is 42, and way past his prime, while he is still a legend, a win over him at this point doesn’t mean much, Lyoto doesn’t stand a chance against Jones. Gustafsson on the other hand is a very good match for Jones, and has earned his title shot!